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How to Pack an Office for Moving

Man putting away notebooks and preparing to pack an officeWhether you’re moving from a traditional workplace to a home office or the other way around, there are special measures to take when packing office equipment, heavy books, and potentially sensitive files. Check out these tips to pack an office like a professional so you can make the move without losing anything important.

Gather Your Materials

You can contact Weleski Transfer to request all the moving supplies you’ll need at competitive prices. If you’d rather acquire them yourself, keep an eye out for sturdy boxes of various sizes. Copy paper boxes are great for carrying documents, books, and small decorations.

For your electronics, it’s best to pack them in their original boxes, but if you no longer have them you can use any sturdy box that’s small enough for a tight fit. You’ll also want packing paper, bubble wrap, packing tape, and premade labels or markers for labeling.

Fetch the Shredder

One of the most important steps is also likely to be the most time-consuming. Check your desk drawers and filing cabinets for documents and sort them into three piles: File, Shred, and Recycle.

For documents you’ll be taking to your new office, organize them by type, priority, client name, or whatever system makes most sense to you, and place them into labeled file folders. These can be packed away in a specialized file box or a common copy paper box. Label your boxes accordingly.

Shred any documents you won’t need that contain sensitive information, like your or your customers’ financial details or any information that’s classified as confidential by your company. Everything else you won’t be taking with you can be recycled.

Secure Your Electronics

Before disconnecting your electronics, snap a quick picture to help you remember the position of the cables and save time during setup in your new location. Use zip ties to bundle cables together and keep them in the same boxes as their original devices. Any small components that are easy to lose can be packed in plastic baggies and also placed inside the box.

Before packing your computer, perform a backup of any files you can’t afford to lose to give yourself added peace of mind. You can upload these to an external hard drive or a cloud application like Dropbox or Google Drive.

It’s ideal to pack your printer, monitor, hard drive, and any other fragile electronics in their original boxes. Otherwise, wrap them in a layer of packing paper and then a layer of bubble wrap, and pack them individually inside the smallest boxes they’ll fit inside, filling any gaps with packing paper. Mark these boxes with “fragile” and an arrow pointing up to indicate they should be handled with particular care and kept upright. Your laptop and its charger can be transported with you in a padded laptop bag.

Pare Down Your Books

Books can add considerable weight and box space to your move, so consider which books are essential in your new office and which can be left behind, given away, or donated. Stack them inside very sturdy, medium to small boxes lined with packing paper.

You can place them flat inside the box or with their spines facing downward, but avoid packing them with the spines facing up to prevent damage. Don’t underestimate how heavy books are—test the weight of your boxes as you go to ensure you’ll be able to comfortably carry them. If your box gets as heavy as you can carry but still has ample space inside, stack non-breakable items like boxes of staples and paperclips, post-its, or other lightweight office supplies on top.

Make a Decision about Your Furniture

Decide whether your furniture should make the trip with you. Don’t think you’ll find a more comfortable chair for your new office? Is your bookshelf an antique that’s important to you? If the furniture you’re taking with you can be disassembled, take it apart and keep small elements like screws and washers in a plastic baggie labeled with the furniture it’s paired with. Add assembly instructions to the baggie as well if you have them. Use packing tape to secure this baggie to a piece of the furniture that won’t be visible in case residue is left behind, like the underside of your desk or the bottom of your chair.

Fragile furniture items can be wrapped in blankets secured with ropes or bungee cords. If drawers aren’t removable, tape them shut with masking tape, and use that same tape to secure pieces of cardboard or packing paper to panels of glass. Removable drawers filled with office supplies or other items can be shrink wrapped and transported as is.

Now that you’ve learned how to pack an office like a pro, get a quote from professional office movers so you can settle into your new office and get back to your normal work routine faster. Contact us if you have any office packing questions or if you’d prefer to hire packing help.

How to Move Fine Art and Sculptures

Canvas painting of a woman with art suppliesWhether its value is monetary or sentimental, it’s normal to be paranoid about having to move art. The unusual shapes, weight, and fragility of paintings and sculptures make safely packing them a special challenge. Follow these guidelines to keep them safe and protect their value.

How to Move Paintings and Drawings

  • For expensive and large artwork, consider a custom-built crate. The crate can be built around the painting on-site and then disassembled when it reaches its new home.
  • Do not use cling wrap, which can create mold. If you want to wrap the artwork to prevent scratching, use a blanket, silicone release paper, unprinted newspaper, or plain brown paper.
  • Avoid packing multiple paintings in one box or crate, even without frames. They may scratch against each other in transit and damage the paint or canvas.
  • For glass-covered artwork, create an X with masking tape over the glass to prevent it from shattering in case of cracks.
  • If your artwork must go into storage, make sure it’s climate-controlled to prevent damage to the paint.
  • Stick large red FRAGILE labels all over the crate or box.

How to Move Sculptures

  • Fill in crevices with foam padding before wrapping the sculpture in a generous layer of bubble wrap.
  • Place foam padding or packing peanuts inside the box on all sides of the sculpture to prevent any movement.
  • Sculptures should be packaged individually to prevent breakage from friction or banging together in the truck.
  • Mark the box as fragile and indicate which side of the sculpture’s box should be facing up with large, red labels on all sides.

When in doubt, call in the experts. At Weleski, we’ve moved every kind of item you can imagine and will treat your valuable artwork with the utmost care. Contact us with questions or to request an estimate today.

Where to Get Moving Boxes

Where to get moving boxes - boy and dog sitting in a boxNothing beats a sturdy, easy-to-stack box for safely moving your belongings. But where do you get moving boxes? Sadly, it often seems like the supply of quality cardboard boxes has suddenly run out the closer you get to your moving date. Don’t resort to throwing your valuables into garbage bags – plan ahead and use these tips to ensure that you have all the clean and durable boxes you need.

Ask Your Friends and Coworkers

Before you start driving around the neighborhood and diving in dumpsters, the first thing you should do is put out a notice on social media that you’re moving and need supplies. The wider you can cast your social net, the better. The average American moves once every five years. Chances that a friend (or a friend of a friend) just finished unpacking and has boxes to spare are high.

If you work in an office, ask if you can take home empty printer paper boxes. Offer to take the packaging from your coworkers’ Amazon shipments off their hands. Maybe they’ll appreciate you saving them a trip to the recycling bin.

Check Online Listings

There’s a good chance that somebody on Freecycle or Craigslist is offering all the free boxes you need in your area. All you have to do is look for a listing. Don’t see anything right now? Post your own listing advertising your need with a contact phone number. Wait a week or so for the calls or texts to roll in. All you have to do is pick them up.

Stop By a Recycling Center

You should ask for permission first, but it’s unlikely that anybody will mind if you take whatever whole boxes you can find from the stacks of cardboard at your local recycling center. After all, reusing materials again and again is even more effective at reducing energy consumption and protecting the environment than recycling!

Visit Area Businesses

The best quality boxes will come from businesses that deal with shipments of dry, clean goods in a variety of sizes. Try an office supply store, a bookstore, or a pharmacy. You may have more luck at local businesses than at chain stores. You’ll get even luckier if you can figure out how often those stores receive shipments. This is where your network of friends can come in handy. Ask around and one of them might be able to alert you to a recent influx of usable boxes.

Do you need help on your quest for boxes? Just ask us and we’ll give you more detailed information about where to get moving boxes and how to get all the moving supplies you need.

How to Move Electronics

Other than dishes and glassware, electronics are some of the most fragile items in your home, and they’re often even more complicated to move. Unless they’re covered against damage, breaking them will take a hefty bite out of your wallet, too. Keep them safe on their journey to your new home by following these 10 tips.

Don’t Make These Moving Mistakes!

“I hate when that happens.” I laughed out loud at those late-night skits where two friends recounted their moments of self-inflicted pain. Funny! But there’s nothing to laugh about if you make costly mistakes when moving. Here are three common pitfalls . . . and some tips for avoiding them.

Avoid Moving Mistakes Get In Home Estimate

Not giving yourself enough time. Unless you’re simply carting a few pieces across town, you need to allow several weeks to plan and prepare for your move. Movers must schedule their people and equipment several weeks in advance. (The lead time is longer during the summer when most people want to move.) If you scramble to secure services at the last minute, you’ll be lucky to find a reputable provider. And it will cost a lot more. Once you arrive at a move date, allow yourself four weeks to cross all the i’s and dot all the t’s.

Tip: Follow this easy-to-use checklist that shows what you need to do—and when to do it—to prepare for your move: Moving Checklist

Moving things you really don’t need. The cost to move your goods is based on weight and distance. So, if you can shed the items you won’t need, do it. (Like those old school books you keep telling yourself you’ll someday want to consult.)

Tip: Hold a moving sale. Or give things away. Many local charities will come to your home and pick things up. You may want to do the same with shelf-stable food. Weleski participates in a program called Move For Hunger. If you wish to donate unopened, non-perishable foods to feed others in need, let us know. We’ll take the items to a local food bank for you.

Failing to Get a Visual Estimate. Some companies may shoot you a price over the phone for your move. But don’t bet on the accuracy. As I mentioned earlier, weight is an important consideration in the cost of your move. Reputable movers will insist on walking through your house and looking at everything to give you an accurate estimate of cost.

Tip: Be sure to show everything. Let your move estimator see every attic space, garage, and cubby so there are no surprises. And be aware that anything you decide to add at the last minute may or may not make it onto the truck—and will increase the cost of your move.

These are just a few of the expensive mistakes people make. To avoid them all, talk to your moving professional when you first decide you will move. The sooner you start your planning, the more likely you are to save money—and less likely to say, “I hate when that happens.”

When you’re ready to start planning your move, call us at 888-224-3330 or send us a message!

Packing? Why Not Make it a Party?

So, you’re moving and you’ve decided to shoulder some of the work yourself, namely the task of getting things boxed up and ready to load onto the truck. Depending on how much you have, packing can be daunting. However, as the old saying goes, “many hands make light work.”  You might have enough people power in your own family to get the job done without stressing out. But you could also use the occasion to bring together good friends. You can enjoy the time together, share memories, and get a lot of busy work done in the process.

Pipacking party for movingck a day and time that works for everybody. A day or two before the truck is scheduled to arrive is ideal. You could even begin a week or two before your moving out day, with books, some tableware, clothing, linens—things you won’t need day-to-day until you get to your new home.

Have the packing supplies on hand when your guests arrive. Brown craft paper, clear packing tape, bubble wrap, foam peanuts, and cardboard cartons. Old newspaper can also come in handy, but beware—the ink may rub off and can smudge or stain.  You can also purchase packing supplies from your local moving company. You may also find used cartons at your favorite grocery. Most stores have a bin for recycling cardboard; just ask the manager.

Before work begins, decide exactly what you want to accomplish. Establish a convenient work area, with plenty of room. A big table works well. So does a wide open floor space, such as in the living room. You might turn on some music to establish a pleasant background.  As you work, mark the contents on the outside of cartons; it will make placing and unpacking things at your new home much easier.

Of course, a party isn’t a party without munchies and drinks. You might wish to finish off some food in your fridge or freezer, since you can’t take it with you (movers are not allowed to transport foods that can spoil). Or you might order in—sub sandwiches or pizza, for instance. If you start your gathering mid-morning or mid-afternoon, your guests will probably have eaten before they arrive. You can work up an appetite together and take a well-deserved break for lunch or dinner.  If you want to nibble while you work, consider foods that aren’t messy, such as raw veggies, pretzels, and finger sandwiches. In any case, have fun and enjoy your time together.

When you’re ready to start planning your move, contact Weleski Transfer of the Pittsburgh/Tarentum area for you free moving quote today!