Posts

How to Pack a Kitchen Like a Professional Mover

Family of three beginning to pack a kitchen

Once you’ve followed our steps for organizing a kitchen for moving, the next step is to learn how to pack one like a pro. With all the fragile and heavy items in a kitchen, it’s easiest to leave packing one to professionals, but here’s how to pack a kitchen yourself and minimize the chance of breaking your appliances and glassware.

Invest in Quality Packing Materials

Weleski Transfer can provide the professional-grade packing materials you need to pack a kitchen and minimize damage to your kitchen goods, like cardboard dividers, packing paper to fill in gaps, and heavy duty boxes that can handle appliances and stacks of dishes.

If you’re using your own boxes, make sure they’re sturdy enough to handle heavy loads, get more boxes than you think you’ll need, and don’t skip out on padding. You can even use bath and dish towels in a pinch, and plastic wrap to keep stacked items from shifting in their boxes. You may also want to invest in color-coded labels so you can easily identify the boxes that are meant to go in your kitchen, and where they’re supposed to be stored.

Identify Your Essentials

If you’ll be making meals up until moving day, or if there’s anything you’ll need to unpack and use right away, set it aside to pack last. Leave out enough dishes and utensils for you and your family, your most-used pots and pans, and appliances you use every day like your microwave or coffee maker. When you pack these everyday essential items, be sure to label them accordingly so they won’t have to go hunting for them later.

Sort Items by Type

Instead of packing place by place in your kitchen, from the pantry to the drawers and cabinets, gather items of the same type from different locations around the kitchen into stacks or piles. Sort dry goods, utensils, pots and pans, glassware, and other categories into the same pile. This will help you remember which items are in which boxes, and will help you identify any duplicates or other things you won’t need in your new kitchen. It will also help you decide where you want things to be put away in your new kitchen if you can easily see how many pans you have, or how many glasses and dishes.

Start Packing

Prepare your boxes, tape, and paper, and set up a packing station on a kitchen table or the floor. Prepare each box by filling it with crumpled packing paper. Here’s the best way to pack common kitchen items:

Appliances

Appliances should be packed in their original boxes whenever possible. If you no longer have the original, pack them in as small a box as you can to ensure a tight fit, and fill in any gaps with padding.

Pots and Pans

You can nest smaller pans inside larger ones, with padding between each to prevent scratching. Place them inside a box and fill in any gaps to prevent shifting during transit. You can wrap glass lids in paper and pack them separately, also making sure to fill in any gaps inside the box.

Dishes and Bowls

Dishes should be packed so they’re standing on edge, instead of in a vertical stack. You can do this by piling each plate on top of the other, with a piece of packing paper layered in between each. Then wrap the entire stack in paper and tape it together with packing tape. Avoid creating a stack higher than the diameter of the plate. When you’re done, place the stack on its side in a tight-fitting box and fill any gaps with paper.

Bowls can be nested inside of each other, with a layer of packing paper in between them. You can stack them the same way as the dishes, but instead of packing them on their side, place stacks of bowls vertically inside a tight-fitting box, with the lips of the bowls facing down.

Glasses and Stemware

Glasses and stemware should be filled with crumbled tissue or paper before packing. Roll each one in a sheet of packing paper, or use corrugated paper for extra protection. If packing glasses and stemware with other items, pack them upside-down, with the lips facing the bottom of the box, never on their sides, and make sure they’re at the top of the box above heavier items.

Knives and Utensils

If your flatware is organized inside a tray, you can simply wrap the full tray in plastic wrap and tape and move it all as one piece. Otherwise, you can pack them loosely on their sides in a small box, or wrapped in paper to prevent scratching.

Knives can be wrapped in packing paper and then a dish towel, with tape or a rubber band around the bundle. Never pack knives facing up. They should be lying on their sides in a box.

Food

Perishables should be stored inside a tightly-packed cooler that remains at 40 degrees or less. Fill in any gaps with ice. Non-perishables can be transported in canvas grocery bags or boxes. Put the most delicate items, bags of chips or loaves of bread, at the top of the bag or box.

Contact us if you have any questions about how to pack a kitchen, or get a free moving quote from Weleski Transfer and request professional packing services.

Finding the Right Neighborhood

When you undertake a move to a different city or town, you’ll be settling into a new neighborhood. Every neighborhood has its own character, a unique mix of homes and businesses, green spaces and recreational facilities, churches, and schools. Neighborhoods are as different as the people who comprise them. So how do you find a neighborhood you will be comfortable in? A place where you will feel more than a passing kinship with your neighbors?

Here are a few resources you may find useful as you go about finding your perfect fit.

Finding the right neighborhood with Weleski

Your real estate agent. In general, realtors who have earned the CRS (Certified Residential Specialist) designation are more knowledgeable than agents who have not. Talk to your agent about your expectations for property values, schools, walkability, noise and light pollution, safety—any and all quality-of-living aspects that are important to you.

Online resources. Several websites compile information on neighborhoods precisely to let people know whether they might want to locate there.

  • Area Vibes lists statistics on livability, amenities, cost of living, crime, education, employment, and housing.
  • You can talk to residents and those with firsthand knowledge of a city’s neighborhoods via the discussion boards at www.city-data.com.
  • Neighborhood Scout offers a subscription service that lets you explore neighborhoods by zip code.
  • You can see how amenable an area is for walking, biking, and public transit via a score (0: worst to 100: best). For a map and table of cities (pop. 200,000 and above) where these scores are published, go here.
  • Where are the best schools located?Just enter a zip code and see for yourself at GreatSchools.org.
  • Atlas Van Lines provides quality-of-life research on many cities in the U.S. and Canada with city guides. You can view these here  (U.S. City Guides) and here (Canada City Guides).
  • You can see a fairly extensive set of data for areas by zip code at bestplaces.net. In addition to typical census-type information, the site also aggregates data on the cost of living, healthcare, and climate.
  • Google Maps provides photo views by address as well as a tool for locating nearby dining, lodging, and transportation resources.
  • Personal Visit. The best way to see what a neighborhood is like is to drive or walk around in it.

If you are planning a visit to the Pittsburgh or Cleveland areas, let us know. There are lots of great neighborhoods in both cities. Our Weleski storage and warehouse movers have been in and out of every local neighborhood many times. Tell us about your expectations and our furniture movers will recommend some areas you may like to consider.

Moving Q&A

Our furniture movers get a lot of questions from customers about what to expect with Atlas moving them. These usually come from families who are about to move for the first time. Here are answers to a few of the more common questions we hear.

How much does it cost to move?Questions and answers for moving

The answer depends on how much your shipment weighs and how far it travels. To give a detailed price quote, we visit your home and see exactly what items you will be moving. We’ll also talk about preparing and packing your things for shipment, what the cost would be for us to do it and what you can do yourself to save money. Weleski has been helping families move for over 100 years. We use our experience to not only make moving easy for you but to help you make it less expensive for yourself. By the way, we also provide quick, ballpark moving estimates here.

How long does it take to move?

Generally, smaller shipments move more quickly than big shipments do. Our warehouse movers at Weleski storage can usually move smaller shipments, those weighing less than 5,000 pounds (such as 2-bedroom apartments or small houses), across the country in ten days or less. Larger moves can take longer, simply because there are more preparation and handling involved. Equipment availability can also be a factor during the busiest moving months (when school is out of session). Moving also requires planning; four weeks typically provides ample time. Here’s a four-week checklist you may find helpful.

Are there things I shouldn’t move? Things I can’t move?

Yes. Now is the best time to let them go of items you no longer need, so they can be of use to someone else. Consider selling them and using the money to offset other expenses. You might like to donate things to charity or give them away to friends. Or, you may simply recycle them. (Nobody really wants that broken wall clock or that collection of empty wine bottles—you could make them vanish at the curb with a post under “free stuff” on Craigslist.)

As for things you can’t move, our furniture movers have a list of “non-allowables,” things they are unable to move or can move only under special circumstances. And there are certain things, like valuables and personal items, that should be moved. Here’s a page that explains all of this in detail.

What happens if something becomes damaged during moving?

Our warehouse movers take extreme care in preparing, handling, and transporting household goods. Still, we encourage every customer to take advantage of Full Value Protection. It’s affordable coverage that provides repair or replacement (market value) of any item that is lost or damaged while in our care. Such events are the exception, rather than the rule; in any case, Full Value Protection provides peace of mind that is relatively inexpensive.

Do you have a question about moving? Just ask us—we’ll get you the answer.

Why Local Movers Love Fall

Fall is arguably the most beautiful season of the year in Pittsburgh. Nights are cooler, crisper. Skies are clear, days are dry.  Pittsburgh skyline during fallAutumn breezes whisper of harvest as they tickle withering cornstalks. Trees erupt in a brilliant array or reds, oranges and magentas mixing in wild splendor. With the rivers reflecting changing leaves, the nearby parks becoming colorful getaways, and the neighborhoods coming to life with festivals; everyone has something to enjoy in autumn. Local movers feel the same way. They just love the fall.

Local moving companies can’t wait for fall. The house movers know that the Steel City will have perfect weather that’s not too hot and not too cold. They also look forward to the well deserved break from the busy season. Don’t think that fall makes local moving in Pittsburgh that much better? Here’s why our local movers would disagree:

Ideal Home Moving Weather

While most people count down the days until they can drink a Pumpkin Spice Latte, local movers count down to fall weather. The comfort index is way up from just a month or two ago. Local moving now is invigorating, not exhausting. Find one person who enjoys schlepping their boxes as the temperature climbs through the 80s and the air feels like a warm, wet towel swaddling your entire body. Trust us, you won’t. That’s why, given the choice, home movers choose October rather than August to relocate.

The “Off-Season” Advantage

Most families schedule their moves during the summer months, when school is out of session. Moving is a lot easier for kids if they can complete the school term, rather than having to uproot mid-term and enroll in another school. Consequently, the moving and storage industry gets extremely busy from May to September. Residential movers are in high demand— so high that it is difficult for any household to move as quickly as they would like. However, once schools are back in session, the demand eases up. And the expected time between booking a move and getting into your new home is much shorter. We call it the “off-season.”

No Season Like Fall

While the demand for moving services is still down, Pittsburgh in the spring and winter isn’t as friendly to local movers. Moving in the winter can come with the challenges of colder or inclement weather, not to mention ice. Moving in  the spring is tricky because of the changing temperatures and storms. Our professional packers and home movers are fully equipped to deliver excellent service regardless of the conditions outside. But moving is always easier on everyone when the weather is mild.

Do you agree with our movers? Are you planning to move within the Pittsburgh area? Weleski is ready to help. Get started on your fall move now with an instant quote for our local moving services.

Weleski Home Moving Service

I was driving the Interstate the other day when I saw an oversize load traveling in the opposite direction. A convoy was moving an entire house intact — it was quite a production. “Well,” I thought “that’s one way to handle the packing.”

Moving Everything but the Kitchen Sink

I’m going to tell you about a slightly different home moving service, look one where everything moves except the house.movers and family in front of moving van

Over the years, our company has provided this home moving service according to one simple principle:  Make it easy for the customer to feel at home.

That’s why the first word in “home moving service” is “home.” It sums up the feeling we want you to have. We want you to feel at home with the entire moving process. And it is a process. Not a rigid process, but a flexible one that fits your family as comfortably as your favorite slippers.

Home Moving is Stressful

I’ve read lots of moving websites and blogs. I’m struck by how many tend to overlook or make light of the emotional component of moving. But emotions are very real. Moving is stressful for all kinds of reasons. You’re leaving a place that has been your family’s home, a place with good friends and fond memories. Love, celebrations, feelings of belonging. Now, you’re going someplace new, and you’re not sure what to expect. You have about a zillion things to do before moving day—on top of your usual day-to-day responsibilities.

You may be one of the few who take such adventures in stride, with more confidence than a stage full of Presidential candidates.  Good for you!  But, most of us are wary, if not fearful, of the new, the unseen, the unknown. And moving is all of that.

So, we, as professional movers, approach home moving service with sensitivity to your feelings. Our first job, before we touch a single piece of furniture, is to provide guidance. We’ll let you know exactly what to expect, when to expect it, and what you can do to make your move easy for you.

The Weleski Home Moving Team

Everyone has a secret to their process, a special sauce, so to speak. Ours is people. Sincere, hard-working folks who know how to make you feel at home with moving. They’ve helped hundreds and hundreds of families of all sizes make good, happy moves. They are ready to help you. One of our team members will be glad to talk to you and help you get started with an in-home estimate. All you have to do is ask. Or, get a free, no-obligation online quote!